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Europe’s best Christmas markets
Written by Momondo   
Tuesday, 19 November 2013

Christmas market
Christmas market in Alsace © by blieusong

Europe’s famous festive markets are a great way to infuse a little tradition, magic and authenticity into your Christmas (shopping). Here’s our pick of the best.

 

 

 

 

 

Dresden – Münzgasse

Image
Christmas market in Dresden © by eiapopeia

The oldest in Germany, Dresden’s Christmas market has been going almost 600 years. Craftsman from the region flock to its 250 or so stalls – as a result the wares here are more traditional and unique than most other markets. The highlight is annual fruitcake (stollen) festival held on the second Sunday in December.

 

 

 

 

 

Copenhagen – Tivoli Gardens

Image
Tivoli at Christmas, Copenhagen © by Mollenborg

Europe’s oldest amusement park is dressed with hundreds of Christmas trees and thousands of lights for its Christmas market. One of the major attractions frozen lake turned ice-skating rink. The food and drink here is as much a draw as the atmosphere and arts and crafts on offer – particularly the glögg (spiced mulled wine) and hot apple dumplings.

 

 

 

 

Salzburg – Cathedral Square and Residence Square

Image
Christmas in Austria © by kimkubrick

One of the most important aspects of a Christmarket is its sense of occasion. Loomed over by an imposing church, looked over by a medieval hilltop castle and centred on a two-storey high fountain encased in an avant-garde glass cone, Salzburg’s market certainly has that. All floodlit, they make the perfect backdrop for browsing arts and crafts.

 

 

 

 

Prague – Old Town Square

Image
Prague Christmas Market © by kimkubrick

While there are lots of markets around town, we think the best is in the heart of the old town. Rows of colourfully decorated huts organised around a giant Christmas tree sell a mix of hand-crafted wooden toys (including classic Czech puppets), handmade jewellery, candles and crystals. Be sure to try the medovina, a honey wine known as mead in English.

 

 

 

 

 

Brussels – Place Sainte-Catherine, Grand Place, and the Fish Market

Image
La Grand-Place in Brussels © by Diueine

With around 240 wooden chalets, Brussels’ market is nothing short of expansive. Many countries are represented here, though many of the stalls offer similar crafts and Christmas decorations. The real attraction is the traditional Belgian food: Waffles, doughnuts, free mussels, caricoles, you name it they’re all here, ready to be washed down with a typically strong local beer.

 

This article is courtesy of Momondo

 
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  • The Wikipedia article about Europe

    This article is about the continent. For the politico-economic union, see European Union. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation).

    Europe is a continent that comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Europe is bordered by the Arctic Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. To the east and southeast, Europe is generally considered as separated from Asia by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits. Yet the non-oceanic borders of Europe—a concept dating back to classical antiquity—are arbitrary; the primarily physiographic term "continent" as applied to Europe also incorporates cultural and political elements whose discontinuities are not always reflected by the continent's current boundaries.

    Europe is the world's second-smallest continent by surface area, covering about 10,180,000 square kilometres (3,930,000 sq mi) or 2% of the Earth's surface and about 6.8% of its land area. Of Europe's approximately 50 countries, Russia is the largest and most populous, spanning 39% of the continent and comprising 15% of its population, while Vatican City is the smallest both in terms of area and population. Europe is the third-most populous continent after Asia and Africa, with a population of 739–743 million or about 11% of the world's population. Europe has a climate heavily affected by warm Atlantic currents that temper winters and summers on much of the continent, even at latitudes along which the climate in Asia and North America is severe. Further from the Atlantic, seasonal differences are mildly greater than close to the coast.

    Europe, in particular ancient Greece, is the birthplace of Western civilization. The fall of the Western Roman Empire, during the migration period, marked the end of ancient history and the beginning of an era known as the "Middle Ages". The Renaissance humanism, exploration, art, and science led the "old continent", and eventually the rest of the world, to the modern era. From this period onwards, Europe played a predominant role in global affairs. Between the 16th and 20th centuries, European nations controlled at various times the Americas, most of Africa, Oceania, and the majority of Asia.

    The Industrial Revolution, which began in the United Kingdom at the end of the 18th century, gave rise to radical economic, cultural, and social change in Western Europe, and eventually the wider world. Both world wars were largely focused upon Europe, contributing to a decline in Western European dominance in world affairs by the mid-20th century as the United States and Soviet Union took prominence. During the Cold War, Europe was divided along the Iron Curtain between NATO in the west and the Warsaw Pact in the east, until the revolutions of 1989 and fall of the Berlin Wall.

    European integration led to the formation of the European Union, a political entity that lies between a confederation and a federation. The EU originated in Western Europe but has been expanding eastward since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. The currency of most countries of the European Union, the Euro, is the most commonly used among Europeans and the EU's Schengen Area abolishes border and immigration controls among most of its member states.

    Definition

    Further information: List of transcontinental countries and Boundaries between continents
    Alb.
    Andorra
    Austria
    Azer.
    Belarus
    Belg.
    BiH
    Bulgaria
    Channel
    Is.(UK)
    Croatia
    Cz. Rep.
    Denmark
    Estonia
    Finland
    France
    Gib. (UK)
    Germany
    Georgia
    Greece
    Hungary
    Iceland
    Ireland
    Italy
    Mann
    (UK)
    S. Mar.
    Kazakhstan
    Kos.
    Latvia
    Liech.
    Lithuania
    Lux.
    Mac.
    Malta
    Moldova
    Mon.
    Mont.
    Nether.
    Norway
    Svalbard (Nor)
    Poland
    Portugal
    Romania
    Russia
    Serbia
    Slovakia
    Slo.
    Spain
    Sweden
    Switz-
    erland
    Turkey
    Ukraine
    United
    Kingdom
    Far. (Dk)
    Vat.
    Armenia
    Cyprus
    Greenland (Dk)
    Adr-
    iatic
    Sea
    Arctic Ocean
    Baltic
    Sea
    Aegean
    Sea
    Barents Sea
    Bay of
    Biscay
    Black
    Sea
    Caspian
    Sea
    Celtic
    Sea
    Greenland Sea
    Baffin Bay
    Gulf of
    Cádiz
    Ligurian
    Sea
    Mediterranean Sea
    North
    Atlantic
    Ocean
    North
    Sea
    Norwegian
    Sea
    Strait of Gibraltar

    The use of the term "Europe" has developed gradually throughout history. In antiquity, the Greek historian Herodotus mentioned that the world had been divided by unknown persons into three parts, Europe, Asia, and Libya (Africa), with the Nile and the River Phasis forming their boundaries—though he also states that some considered the River Don, rather than the Phasis, as the boundary between Europe and Asia. Europe's eastern frontier was defined in the 1st century by geographer Strabo at the River Don. The Book of Jubilees described the continents as the lands given by Noah to his three sons; Europe was defined as stretching from the Pillars of Hercules at the Strait of Gibraltar, separating it from North Africa, to the Don, separating it from Asia.

    A cultural definition of Europe as the lands of Latin Christendom coalesced in the 8th century, signifying the new cultural condominium created through the confluence of Germanic traditions and Christian-Latin culture, defined partly in contrast with Byzantium and Islam, and limited to northern Iberia, the British Isles, France, Christianised western Germany, the Alpine regions and northern and central Italy. The concept is one of the lasting legacies of the Carolingian Renaissance: "Europa" often figures in the letters of Charlemagne's court scholar, Alcuin. This division—as much cultural as geographical—was used until the Late Middle Ages, when it was challenged by the Age of Discovery. The problem of redefining Europe was finally resolved in 1730 when, instead of waterways, the Swedish geographer and cartographer von Strahlenberg proposed the Ural Mountains as the most significant eastern boundary, a suggestion that found favour in Russia and throughout Europe.

    Europe is now generally defined by geographers as the western part of Eurasia, with its boundaries marked by large bodies of water to the north, west and south; Europe's limits to the far east are usually taken to be the Urals, the Ural River, and the Caspian Sea; to the southeast, including the Caucasus Mountains, the Black Sea and the waterways connecting the Black Sea to the Mediterranean Sea.

    Islands are generally grouped with the nearest continental landmass, hence Iceland is generally considered to be part of Europe, while the nearby island of Greenland is usually assigned to North America. Nevertheless, there are some exceptions based on sociopolitical and cultural differences. Cyprus is closest to Anatolia (or Asia Minor), but is usually considered part of Europe both culturally and politically and currently is a member state of the EU. Malta was considered an island of North Africa for centuries.

    © This material from Wikipedia is licensed under the GFDL.